AUG 1 TO SEP 30

ENTRY PERIOD 

Wednesday, August 1 –
midnight Sunday, September 30. 

The entry period for 2018 is longer than in previous years. We opened entries earlier, from 1 August – and closed off at midnight on 30 September. 

 

OCT 7

JUDGING

Sunday, October 7, 2018

12:00 PM  6:00 PM

Judging takes place for several weeks prior to the official day of judging. All your work is shared electronically and in print form with the Judging panel, so read everything and make notations which they bring to the judging day where they meet at The Dowse and discuss as a panel before selecting the finalists and overall winners.

 

NOV 1

AWARDS NIGHT

Thursday, November 1, 2018

6:00 PM  8:00 PM

Awards night at ECC in Wellington.


HOW TO PREPARE YOUR ENTRY

STEP 1

Make sure you've read the Terms & Conditions and prepared your entry correctly.

Use the online entry link to submit your entry. You will need to ZIP your files and attach as one package.

STEP 2

Fill out the online form. 

You will need to include your contact details and your tutors contact details. You will also need to select your tertiary institution from a dropdown list.

STEP 3

Upload your entry. 

There are Four files to upload (no more, no less).

Read the steps below carefully.


HOW TO LABEL YOUR FILES

UPLOAD FILE # 1

FILE #1 - A3 LANDSCAPE PDF

Maximum files size: 5MB 

Must include: 

A. Name and Title of your work (do not include the tertiary institution) in the position as shown. 

B. The academic brief. This is what you were given by the tertiary institution as the design challenge (or were asked to generate yourself under the auspices of the institution). 300 words maximum. 

C. Your personal statement should clearly identify the essential elements of your response and solution to the brief, including the ideas and thinking behind your solution and the process of creating it.

The judges need to be able to understand the materiality of your design so please describe what materials you have used, as it can be difficult to see in the imagery. It is also helpful to photograph your designs from all angles, and provide context for the size and scale of your designs.
Please keep this short and concise. 300 word maximum.

D. Three separate images which best display your design. These can be laid out on the PDF in any orientation. The image below is an example only.

UPLOAD FILE #2, 3 AND 4

Upload the three separate images you used in the PDF presentation, as three separate Hi-Res jpegs.

FILE # 2 - Image 1

Maximum files size: 1MB 

File Naming Convention:
Category_your full name_your work’s title_Image1 

ie: Furniture_John Smith_Big Table_Image1

 

FILE # 3 - Image 2

Maximum files size: 1MB 

File Naming Convention: 
Category_your full name_your work’s title_Image2 

ie: Furniture_John Smith_Big Table_Image2

 

FILE # 4 - Image 3

Maximum files size: 1MB 

File Naming Convention: 
Category_your full name_your work’s title_Image3

ie: Furniture_John Smith_Big Table_Image3


HANDY HINTS ON PREPARING YOUR ENTRY

  1. Choose the images of your design wisely.
    Make sure the judge is able to understand your design with a selection of a few images, rather than overcrowding the page.

  2. The less words on your PDF, the better.
    Words should support your imagery and help to clarify and explain aspects which can’t be seen in an image.

  3. Photograph your design ensuring you have the correct lighting and a simple background.
    Ensure you provide HIGH RES imagery 300dpi at A4 size with your entry.

  4. Ensure the design looks flawless.

  5. At times it can be advantageous to show how your design is used in context.
    i/e if Fashion show on person, and same for jewellery to give the judges a context of size and dimension.

  6. Select your work carefully – edit!
    If you have a collection choose the strongest designs - more is not necessarily better if they are not all strong.

  7. Ideally the design actually exists in a prototype or final form.
    If your design is chosen as a winner, it will be required to be on display at ECC Lighting in Wellington, therefore ideally the design actually exists in a prototype or final form.